Wednesday, 12 June 2013

Apologies and Tomato Chutney.



Wow.

Okay, I'll admit it: you guys have been sorely neglected. Two months since I last gave you a new post? Utterly ridiculous.

However, in my defence, I have been writing a 25-page-long Ancient History assignment (why oh why did I choose Ancient History?) and reading Les Miserables. That, my friends, is a long book - but totally worth it :)

However, seeing as I have a German exam in, like, an hour, I'd better get cracking with the recipe. For some reason, people in our house have a tendency towards consuming large amounts of chutney on their sandwiches - so much so, that Mum was buying practically a new jar every week. I have no idea why this is so, but I decided, why not just make our own? It's way cheaper, easier, and makes more than what we would usually buy. Basically, what I'm saying is, I've made this recipe so many times I can do it with my eyes shut, so why don't you guys give it a go? :)



Tomato Chutney

1 kilo of ripe tomatoes, peeled (see Note for how to peel tomatoes)
1 1/2 cups of sugar
1 cup of apple cider vinegar
1 large clove of garlic, crushed
1 teaspoon of salt
A sprinkle of cayenne pepper (I've learned from experience that it's hotter than you'd think - if you don't like spicy things, then stick with a sprinkle)
1 teaspoon of ground ginger


  1. Dice the peeled tomatoes and combine in a big pot with the sugar, vinegar, garlic, salt and cayenne pepper. 
  2. Bring the mixture to a slow simmer and cook, stirring, until the syrup thickens a little and the tomatoes are reduced to a sort of pulp. This can take from 45 minutes up to 2 hours.
  3. Add the ginger and cook for another 5 minutes. Remove the chutney from the heat and ladle into hot sterilised jars.
  4. Keep in the refrigerator; makes about 2 1/2 cups.
Note: To peel tomatoes: cut a cross-shape in the base of the tomatoes (the opposite end from the stem). Place the tomatoes in a pot of boiling water and let them boil for about 30 seconds, or until the skin begins to blister and peel off. Move them into a colander in the sink and run cold water over them while you peel the skin off with your fingers. Make sure there are no blemishes or mould growing on them - if there is, then cut it out. To sterilise jars: making sure the jars have been washed and are completely clean, place the jars and their lids in an oven at 100C for around 5 - 10 minutes. Please note, though, that if you put cold glass jars straight into a hot oven, they will crack, so put them in the oven when it is cool and warm the oven up with them inside.






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